misslibrelula:

thepierglass:

I’d buy a replica of this penny for sure. (via British Museum - Penny defaced by suffragettes


This coin – a perfectly ordinary penny minted in 1903 – was part of this civil disobedience. Stamped with the suffragette slogan “votes for women”, it circulated as small change, and spread the message of the campaigners. At the time, defacing a coin was a serious criminal offence, and the perpetrators risked a prison sentence had they been caught. We don’t know when the slogan was stamped on this coin, but stamping it on small change rather than a silver coin meant that it was less likely to be taken out of circulation by the banks. The message could have circulated for many years, until the law giving women the same voting rights as men was passed in 1928.

That was clever, suffragettes! ♥

That was a good move! Should start writing on bills, now: permanent markers are so cheep nowadays…  ;-)

misslibrelula:

thepierglass:

I’d buy a replica of this penny for sure. (via British Museum - Penny defaced by suffragettes

This coin – a perfectly ordinary penny minted in 1903 – was part of this civil disobedience. Stamped with the suffragette slogan “votes for women”, it circulated as small change, and spread the message of the campaigners. At the time, defacing a coin was a serious criminal offence, and the perpetrators risked a prison sentence had they been caught. We don’t know when the slogan was stamped on this coin, but stamping it on small change rather than a silver coin meant that it was less likely to be taken out of circulation by the banks. The message could have circulated for many years, until the law giving women the same voting rights as men was passed in 1928.

That was clever, suffragettes!

That was a good move! Should start writing on bills, now: permanent markers are so cheep nowadays…  ;-)

Anonymous said: which medium was used in the Royal Paintings of Jodphur?

More than one. The paintings shown at the British Museum (2009) were as varying as miniatures and large artworks.

museumsandstuff:

museumdiaries: sophistrie: andwelikedeverything: 


Rules of the British Museum, 1759 


Click through to read the whole thing!

Brilliant! We should not forget, however, that “the meaning of a text is mediated by its readers"…   ;-)

museumsandstuff:

museumdiariessophistrieandwelikedeverything

Rules of the British Museum, 1759 

Click through to read the whole thing!

Brilliant! We should not forget, however, that “the meaning of a text is mediated by its readers"…   ;-)

juliettealexandra:

On this day in 1220 Frederick II was crowned Holy Roman Emperor.
Thanks to twitter.com/britishmuseum for this fact!

That was the time, when “Greeks” (i.e. Byzantines) and Jews, Saracens and Normans would more or less peacefully live in Sicily and Southern Italy, making the country a brilliant, cultured and (relatively) moderate place to live in. That’s the time my ancestors (a part of them, at least), came in to Italy from France…
After that, the petty communal interests of North Italian cities prevailed (with the interested help of the Pope’s temporal power) - and pushed civilization back for centuries.

juliettealexandra:

On this day in 1220 Frederick II was crowned Holy Roman Emperor.

Thanks to twitter.com/britishmuseum for this fact!

That was the time, when “Greeks” (i.e. Byzantines) and Jews, Saracens and Normans would more or less peacefully live in Sicily and Southern Italy, making the country a brilliant, cultured and (relatively) moderate place to live in. That’s the time my ancestors (a part of them, at least), came in to Italy from France…

After that, the petty communal interests of North Italian cities prevailed (with the interested help of the Pope’s temporal power) - and pushed civilization back for centuries.

UK - Lean Cows Ahoy!

4-6 October 2010, Manchester @ Central Convention Complex.

Advertised as “Europe’s largest museum event”, expecting over 1,500 museum professionals, this year’s Museums Association Conference & Exhibition comes at a moment of radically changing times…

Keynotes and speakers include Neil MacGregor director of the British Museum, Ed Vaizey Minister for culture, Alex Poots director of the Manchester International Festival, Victoria Dickenson from the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, and incoming MA President Vanessa Trevelyan.

…So are we at the end of what Tony Blair once described as a ‘golden age for museums’, or will digital technology - like that used so successfully by the BBC and British Museum in the A History of the World project - come to the rescue?
Revolution on Paper - Mexico 1910/1960

RT @britishmuseum Revolution on paper: Mexican prints 1910/60 http://tr.im/tPz7 Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros..

Museum’s Future - Publishing & Broadcasting?

RT @GuWa: “The future has to be… the museum as a publisher and broadcaster” Neil MacGregor , Director of the British Museum http://bit.ly/15qNg4

Museums' Future

Museums’ future could be the internet, allowing them to transform their relationship with public, and becoming more like multimedia organisations.

The Guardian published today the vision of museums’ future sketched out last night by Sir Nicholas Serota (director of Tate) and Neil MacGregor (director of British Museum), speaking at an event at the London School of Economics.

British Museum - “Pecha Kucha Night”

RT (edited) @miaridge “my notes on #mwpkn Museum pecha kucha night are up at http://bit.ly/efKDv ” - it’s a very interesting recap! :-)